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College graduate students to showcase research at Capitol

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

LAWRENCE — Thirteen University of Kansas graduate students from the Lawrence campus and KU Medical Center were selected to showcase their research projects for state lawmakers and the public at the Graduate Student Research Summit from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 14, in the rotunda of the state Capitol in Topeka. Two of these students are in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences.

The KU representatives will join graduate students from Kansas State and Wichita State universities at the event, which is intended to raise awareness of the graduate programs at all four institutions and the importance of graduate students’ research at state universities.

Among the topics KU students from Lawrence and the Medical Center will present:

  • The role of hormones in prostate and breast cancer treatment
  • A study of the structure of the Ogallala Formation aquifer
  • The barriers that contribute to a shortage of baccalaureate-prepared nurses in rural Kansas hospitals
  • The production of biofuels from algae grown in wastewater
  • The impact of requiring photo identification at Kansas polling places

Following the presentations, awards funded by KansasBio will be presented to two projects from each campus. KansasBio was founded in 2004 by the Kansas Technology Enterprise Corp. and the Kansas City Area Life Sciences Institute to unify the state’s bioscience industry, academic research institutions and economic development organizations. Its goals are to enhance the state’s business and research climate in the state and to work with leaders across the state to attract and retain bioscience talent, companies and funding.

Participating students from the College, their departments and presentations titles:

Chelsie Bright, political science, Bucklin, Mo, “Got ID? An Analysis of Kansas’ Voter ID Law”

Russell Harlow, geology, Prosper, Texas, “Employment of Non-Traditional Techniques to Improve Stratigraphic Correlation of the High Plains Succession and Their Applications for Future Groundwater Management”