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Twenty sophomores named University Scholars

Thursday, January 24, 2013

LAWRENCE — Twenty University of Kansas sophomores have been named to the 32nd class of the University Scholars Program.

Administrated by the University Honors Program, this competitive opportunity is for students selected on the basis of academic credentials, commitment to their education, intellectual promise and evaluations by instructors, advisers and other faculty members. Students in their second year at KU with a 3.75 cumulative grade-point average are invited to apply.

Each University Scholar receives a $250 scholarship per semester for five semesters, is assigned a faculty mentor and enrolls in an interdisciplinary seminar taught by a faculty member noted for a distinguished teaching record.

The 2013 University Scholars are enrolled in a seminar on the topic “Searching for a Just Machine: Why Computing Came to Be and What It Will Become,” taught by Perry Alexander, professor of electrical engineering and computer science and the director of the Information and Telecommunication Technology Center. The interdisciplinary course will explore three themes: where computing came from and why; the promises and limitations of what can be computed; and the social phenomenon surrounding computing’s past and present. They will celebrate the beginning of the semester with a banquet Jan. 27 featuring keynote speaker Laura Martin, University Honors Program alumna and professor in preventive medicine & public health at the University of Kansas Medical Center.

The University Scholars Program was founded in the spring of 1982 by Judge Deanell Tacha, then vice chancellor for academic affairs, and the late Professor Francis Heller. The program now counts more than 660 alumni who have all gone on to great careers in varied fields.

Funds for the University Scholars Program are managed by KU Endowment, the independent, nonprofit organization serving as the official fundraising and fund-management organization for KU. Founded in 1891, KU Endowment was the first foundation of its kind at a U.S. public university. Additional support is provided by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Office of the Provost.

University Scholars are listed below by hometown, major, parents’ names (if available), high school and faculty mentor.

  • Connor Bowman, Lenexa, a sophomore in pre-pharmacy with a minor in music;  Laine and Brent Bowman; Shawnee Mission West High School; mentored by Phil Baringer in physics.
  • Stacie Burnett, Salina, a sophomore majoring in architecture; Larry and Brenda Burnett; Salina High School Central; mentored by Jarron M. Saint Onge in sociology and health policy and management.
  • Noah Compo, Prairie Village, an undecided sophomore; Lisa Raich and Daniel Compo; Shawnee Mission Northwest; mentored by John Hoopes in anthropology.
  • Ellie Eastes, Pratt, a sophomore in applied behavioral science with a minor in sociology; Bill and Dee Dee Eastes; Pratt High School; mentored by Joey Sprague in sociology.
  • David Gier, Overland Park, a sophomore in physics and interdisciplinary computing; Rick and Cindy Gier; Saint Thomas Aquinas High School; mentored by Rick Levy in the School of Law.
  • Amanda Gress, Overland Park, a sophomore in political science; Larry and Michele Gress; Saint Thomas Aquinas High School; mentored by Donna Ginther in economics.
  • Katherine Gwynn, Olathe, a sophomore in English (creative writing), and women, gender and sexuality studies; Matthew and Tamera Gwynn; Saint Thomas Aquinas High School; mentored by Iris Smith Fischer in English.
  • Rachel Hagan, Topeka, a sophomore in women, gender and sexuality studies; Kathy and Ben Hagan; Shawnee Heights Senior High School; mentored by Toni Johnson in the School of Social Welfare.
  • Virginia Helgeson, Olathe, a sophomore in social welfare and religious studies with a  minor in human sexuality studies; Doug and Donna Helgeson; Olathe South High School; mentored by Jomella Watson-Thompson in applied behavioral sciences.
  • Carlo Manrique, Arequipa, Peru; a sophomore in finance and accounting; Rocio Aquize and Gillther Manrique; mentored by Venkat Bendapudi in the School of Business.
  • Micah Melia, Prairie Village, a sophomore in anthropology with minors in psychology and economics; Tom and Anne Melia; Shawnee Mission East High School; mentored by Marike Janzen in humanities and Western civilization.
  • Mitchell Newton, Overland Park, a sophomore in chemistry; Neal and Sheila Newton; Blue Valley Northwest High School; mentored by John Symons in philosophy.
  • William Putzier, Salina, a sophomore in finance and east Asian studies; Pat and Kathleen Putzier; Salina High School Central; mentored by Jianbo Zhang in economics.
  • Kayla Sale, a sophomore in evolutionary biology and ecology and mathematics; John and Jamea Sale; Olathe North High School; mentored by Marta Vicente in history.
  • Sukhindervir Sandhu, Overland Park, a sophomore in biochemistry; Jagir Kaur; Shawnee Mission West High School; mentored by Whitney Baker in the University Libraries.
  • Molly Schemm, Osage City, a sophomore in psychology; Doug and Cheryl Schemm and Anna Schemm; Osage City High School; mentored by Ric Steele in applied behavioral sciences.
  • Sebastian Schoneich, Lawrence, a sophomore in biochemistry and philosophy; Christian Schoneich and Elena Ghezzo; Free State High School; mentored by Tom Tuozzo in philosophy.
  • Lauren Schumacher, Rolla, Mo.; a sophomore in aerospace engineering; Linda and John Schumacher; Rolla Senior High School; mentored by Catherine Shenoy in the School of Business.
  • Patrick Smith, Overland Park, a sophomore in finance and accounting; Pamela and Stuart Smith; Blue Valley North High School; mentored by Paul Koch in the School of Business.
  • Haider Tarar, Islamabad, Pakistan, a sophomore in chemical engineering; M Zaman Tarar and Bushra Zaman Tarar; mentored by Beverly Mack in African and African American Studies.

The University Honors Program is part of the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences at the University of Kansas. The College encompasses more than 55 departments, programs, centers and the School of the Arts.