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Shawn Alexander, associate professor in the Department of African & African-American Studies and director of the Langston Hughes Center, was honored in the faculty/staff category at the first Diversity Leadership Awards from the Office of Diversity and Equity. Through his work at the Langston Hughes center, Alexander has led four major symposia and 80 talks and programs covering issues of race, diversity, equity and inclusion.

Barbara Anthony-Twarog, professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy, was selected by KU Endowment as a 2016 Chancellors Club Teaching Award recipient. Anthony-Twarog was recognized at the Oct. 21 Chancellors Club celebration and will receive a $10,000 award.

Paul Atchley, Associate Dean for Academic Innovation and Student Success and professor in the Department of Psychology, and Ruth Ann Atchley, professor in the Department of Psychology, were recently awarded the U.S. Forest Service Excellence in Wilderness Stewardship Research Award for their research. Their “This is Your Brain on Nature” study revealed an increase in creativity after spending four days backpacking in the wilderness disconnected from electronic devices.

Beth Bailey, foundation distinguished professor in the Department of History, has been elected to the Society of American Historians in recognition of the literary and scholarly distinction of her writing. The Society was founded in 1939 by historian and journalist Allan Nevins to promote literary excellence in the writing and presentation of history.

Mary Banwart, director of the Institute for Leadership Studies and associate professor in the Department of Communication Studies, was awarded a Steeples Service to Kansans Award. Banwart was honored for her work founding and directing the Kansas Women’s Leadership Institute. The Steeples award recognizes and encourages faculty who provide outstanding service to the people of Kansas by extending the reach of their teaching and research across our state.

William Barnett, Oswald Distinguished Professor of Macroeconomics, won the 2017 John C. Wright Graduate Mentor Award from the College. The award recognizes faculty mentors who have helped graduate students make the most of their experience and opportunities at KU.

Catherine Batza, assistant professor in the Department of Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies, received the Friends Book Publication Award from the Friends of the Hall Center for her upcoming publication "Before AIDS." Batza’s book "Before AIDS" re-examines the existing historical narrative of AIDS by acknowledging the pivotal role of pre-existing gay health clinics, showing that gay communities had more developed political and medical infrastructures than history currently suggests. Batza was also named as a Hall Center resident fellow for 2017-’18 and will work on her book project, “AIDS in the Heartland.”

Alice Bean, distinguished professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy, was appointed to be a University Distinguished Professor in recognition for her work in experimental particle physics. Bean also has been named a fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The fellows are elected by their peers to honor their efforts to advance science or its applications.

Christopher K. Beard, distinguished foundation professor in the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, will head work under a $100,000 grant from the David B. Jones Foundation to train students in vertebrate paleontology. The student work and training would center on the early evolution of mammals in Wyoming and Turkey.

Christian Beer, communication and events coordinator in the School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures, was named one of KU’s employees of the month in August. Beer manages social media, events, and assists with recruitment and development for foreign-language departments and related programs.

The Behavioral Neuroscience degree program in the Department of Psychology won the 2017 Excellence in Undergraduate Advising Award from the College. The award honors a department or program that is doing exemplary work to improve advising at KU. The award was accepted by Evangelia Chrysikou, assistant professor of psychology and director of the behavioral neuroscience program, and Mike Vitevitch, professor and chair of psychology.

Leslie Bennett, associate professor in the Department of Theatre, won the 2017 Grant Goodman Undergraduate Mentor Award from the College. The award recognizes faculty who continue to have lasting mentoring relationships long after they leave the classroom.

Monica Biernat, professor in the Department of Psychology, was appointed to be a University Distinguished Professor for her work on the effect of race and gender stereotypes on categorization, judgment, behavior and communication processes.

Mike Blum, distinguished professor in the Department of Geology, along with colleagues at other universities, was recently selected as winners of the 2016 Shelton Award for their paper “Record of Cretaceous through Paleogene Gulf of Mexico Drainage Integration from Detrital Zircons.” The award is given annually to the best paper published by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists.

Kristin Bowman-James, distinguished professor in the Department of Chemistry, recently was featured in Chemical & Engineering News for her work on separations research. The work is funded by the Department of Energy.

Nancy Brady, associate professor, and Steven Warren, distinguished professor, both of the Department of Speech-Language-Hearing, were awarded a grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to aid in their research on the effects of parenting on the development and behavior of adolescents with Fragile X syndrome, the leading genetic cause of autism. The five-year grant is for $2.4 million. Brady also received a 2017 University Scholarly Achievement Award. The award, presented by the chancellor, recognizes significant scholarly or research achievement for scholars in the middle of their careers. Research colleagues submitted the winners for consideration. The award recognizes either a truly outstanding scholarly or research contribution, or a series of closely related contributions.

Hannah Britton, associate professor in the Departments of Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies and Political Science, is the principal investigator in a study on human trafficking in the Midwest that was recently awarded a $30,000 National Science Foundation grant. Britton and Corinne Schwarz, a KU doctoral candidate in women, gender and sexuality studies and a co-principal investigator for the project, were assisted in the grant proposal development by the KU Institute for Policy & Social Research.

Christopher Brown, professor in the Department of Geography & Atmospheric Science and the Environmental Studies Program, was named the 2016 recipient of the George and Eleanor Woodyard International Educator Award. The award is given to a faculty member who demonstrates outstanding leadership in strengthening KU’s international programming. Brown’s work includes teaching and research on Latin America and a service-learning study abroad program to El Salvador.

Marie Brown, assistant professor in the Department of History, won the 2017 Vice Chancellor for Research Book Publication Award for her upcoming work "Khartoum at Night: Fashion and Body Politics in Imperial Sudan." The annual award is administered by the Hall Center for the Humanities.

Marco Caricato, assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry, has received a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation. The $625,000 grant supports Caricato’s project, entitled “First Principles Evaluation of Optical Activity in Solids."

So-Min Cheong, associate professor in the Department of Geography & Atmospheric Science, was awarded a grant from the National Academies’ Gulf Research Program for her proposal, “Community Cohesion and Recovery after the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.”

Vitaly Chernetsky, associate professor in the Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures, was awarded the PEN/ Heim Translation Fund Grant by PEN America for his translation of Ukrainian writer Sophia Andrukhovych’s best-selling novel Felix Austria.

Evangelia G. Chrysikou, assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology, was the recipient of the Schowen Undergraduate Research Mentor Award for her work mentoring and developing undergraduate researchers. The award provides recipients with $1,000.

John Colombo, professor in the Department of Psychology and director of the Kansas Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center, was recently awarded a five year, $5.4 million grant for the KIDDRC. The award provides support to the work of 43 scientists on the topic of intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Tony Corbeill, professor in the Department of Classics, received the Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit for his book “Sexing the World: Grammatical Gender and Biological Sex in Ancient Rome.” The Goodwin award recognizes the best books in the field of Classical Studies.

Luis Corteguera, professor in the Department of History, won the 2017 Byron A. Alexander Graduate Mentor Award from the College. The award recognizes faculty mentors who have helped graduate students make the most of their experience and opportunities at KU.

Christopher Cushing, assistant professor in the Department of Psychology, has been awarded the Routh Early Career Award in Pediatric Psychology from the Society of Pediatric Psychology. The award recognizes one member annually making significant contributions to the field of pediatric psychology in research, clinical training and service. He will be honored at the SPPAC meeting in April.

John Derby, associate professor in the Department of Visual Art, won a 2017 J. Michael Young Advisor Award from the College. The award recognizes exceptional commitment to undergraduate advising.

Brian Donovan, associate professor in the Department of Sociology, will be one of the featured speakers in the 2017-2018 Hall Center Humanities Lecture Series. His talk, “American Golddigger: Law, Culture, and Marriage in the Early Twentieth Century,” traces the history of the “gold digger” from 1910s chorus girl slang to a powerful stereotype that shaped understandings of gender and matrimony. His presentation is scheduled for March 26, 2018.

David J. Ekerdt, professor in the Department of Sociology and director of the Gerontology Center, was elected as president of the Gerontological Society of America by its members. The organization is the nation’s largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging.

Charles Epp, distinguished professor in the School of Public Affairs & Administration, was appointed to the Douglas County Criminal Justice Coordinating Council. Epp will serve as an expert on race relations as the council addresses disproportionate jailing of minorities. Epp also was named a University Distinguished Professor for his research on the sources and effects of legal change, particularly regarding rights and racial discrimination.

Hume Feldman, professor and chair in the Department of Physics & Astronomy, was elected Fellow of the American Physical Society. Feldman was elected by the APS Council of Representatives upon recommendation of the Division of Astrophysics.

Heather Getha-Taylor, associate professor in the School of Public Affairs & Administration, received the Steeples Service to Kansas Award, which honors faculty contributions to the people of Kansas through guidance on issues such as collaborative thinking, leadership development, and recruiting and sustaining a strong municipal workforce. The award provides recipients with $1,000 and an additional $1,000 base adjustment to their salaries.

W. Matthew Gillispie, clinical associate professor in the department of Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences & Disorders, was honored as a 2017 Man of Merit for his work providing services and clinical education to those in need. Gillispie also received the Certification of Recognition for Special Contributions in Multicultural Affairs from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. The certificate signifies distinguished contributions to the field of speech-language pathology.

Donna Ginther, professor in the Department of Economics and director of KU’s Center for Science, Technology & Economic Policy, and Michelle Johnson-Motoyama, associate professor of social welfare, were awarded a three-year, $1.05 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control  to study the effect of economic and social safety net policies on child neglect in the United States. Ginther also testified before the Commission on Evidence-Based Policy Making concerning the availability and use of government data for program design. She has advocated for an online data-sharing infrastructure to help researchers and policymakers make more informed decisions on societal issues. Ginther, along with Dennis O’Rourke, foundation distinguished professor in the Department of Anthropology, recently spoke at The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) 2017 Annual Meeting in Boston, MA. AAAS is a non-profit dedicated to advancing science for the benefit of all people.

Angela Gist, assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies, has been awarded a summer writing fellowship from the American Association of University Women. AAUW provides grants to assist women writing and researching to achieve their academic and professional goals. Founded in 1881, AAUW is one of the world’s largest sources of funding for graduate women.

James Gunn, professor emeritus in the Department of English and award-winning science fiction author, received a lifetime teaching award from the Writing the Rockies writers conference of Western Colorado State University.

Kristi Henderson, director of communications, was awarded three CASE District VI institutional awards for the communications’ team’s work in advertising and promoting the College to future students, current students, and alumni. The College received gold for advertising, silver for annual magazines and bronze for The College Ampersand undergraduate newsletter.

John Hoopes, professor in the Department of Anthropology, was reappointed to the 11-member State Historic Sites Board of Review. The board reviews sites and recommends them to be registered as historic places. Hoopes also is consulting and contributing for an upcoming exhibition and accompanying book “Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas,” which will be featured at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles.

Kim Hubbel, department and undergraduate secretary in the Department of Physics & Astronomy, has been named the recipient of this year’s C.L.A.S.S. Award. The award is presented annually to a staff member who works in a department or organization overseen by Student Affairs. The award recognizes achievements in student services that show a commitment to the needs and welfare of KU students.

David Johnson, associate professor in the Department of Psychology, was awarded a grant from the Department of Defense to study traumatic brain injury in military personnel. Johnson’s research will be in collaboration with Kansas military posts at Fort Riley and Fort Leavenworth. Johnson is also one of the co-investigators at the KU Alzheimer’s Disease Center, one of only 31 centers nationwide. The Center had its national designation renewed for five years by the National Institute of Aging.

Michael Johnson, associate professor in the Department of Chemistry, was recently featured by the American Chemical Society for his research on how chemotherapy affects the chemical makeup of the brain.

Paul Johnson, director of the Center for Research Methods & Data Analysis, has been selected for the2016 Best of Lawrence Awards, Research Service category. The Best of Lawrence awards honor the achievements and accomplishments of businesses and organizations throughout the Lawrence area.

Mary Klayder, University Honors Lecturer in the Department of English, won a 2017 J. Michael Young Academic Advisor Award from the College. The award recognizes exceptional commitment to undergraduate advising.

William Keel, professor and director of graduate studies at the Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, received the Outstanding Achievement Award from the Society for German-American Studies for his distinguished contributions to his field of study.

Paul Kelton, associate dean for the humanities in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences and professor of history, and Kristine Latta, director of the College Office of Graduate Affairs, received a $25,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Next Generation Humanities Ph.D. Planning Grant focuses on “tackling the issue of how Ph.D. students who immerse themselves deeply in graduate humanities research and writing can look to apply their skills and experience beyond teaching and professor positions to a broader range of careers,” according to the NEH. Kelton also was honored for his work co-editing the book “Beyond Germs.” The book was selected by Choice, a publishing unit of the Association of College & Research Libraries, as an Outstanding Academic title of 2016.

Diana Koslowsky, administrative officer in the School of Public Affairs & Administration, was selected to Leadership Lawrence’s 2017 class. Leadership Lawrence is a professional development program created by the Chamber of Lawrence to provide participants first-hand exposure to the inner workings of Lawrence and Douglas County.

Jonathan Lamb, assistant professor in the Department of English, was named a Hall Center Resident Fellow for 2017-’18. Lamb will work on his book project, “Bookish Words: Writing about the Material Text in Early Modern England.”

Kristine Latta, director of the College Office of Graduate Affairs, and Paul Kelton, associate dean for the humanities in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences and professor of history, received a $25,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Next Generation Humanities Ph.D. Planning Grant focuses on “tackling the issue of how Ph.D. students who immerse themselves deeply in graduate humanities research and writing can look to apply their skills and experience beyond teaching and professor positions to a broader range of careers,” according to the NEH.

Ari Linden, assistant professor in the Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, was named a Hall Center Resident Fellow for 2017-’18. Linden will work on his book project, “Experience and Posterity: Karl Kraus and the Substance of Satire.”

Patricia Manning, associate professor in the Department of Spanish & Portuguese, was awarded the Hall Center’s Mid-Career Research Fellowship. Manning will work on her book project, “Taste and Economics in the Age of the Inquisition: Publishing and Consuming Novella Collections in Early Modern Madrid.”

Cecilia Menjívar, Foundation Distinguished Professor of Sociology, is one of 35 scholars to receive a prestigious Andrew Carnegie Fellowship in 2017. The fellowship supports research in social sciences and humanities with up to $200,000 awarded to each fellow. It is the most generous stipend of its kind. The fellowship will allow Menjívar to expand research on immigrants living in between legal statuses.

Jill Mignacca, office manager and graduate coordinator in the Department of Spanish & Portuguese, was recently named a 2016-17 staff fellow. The Staff Fellows Program strives to provide university staff with opportunities for professional development.

John Nalbandian, professor emeritus in the School of Public Affairs & Administration, was honored with a Regional Leadership Award from the Mid-America Regional Council for his leadership in educating and mentoring public employees and his work with local governments.

Rosemary O’Leary, distinguished professor in the School of Public Affairs & Administration, has been selected to receive the American Political Science Association’s 2016 John Gaus Award for lifetime of exemplary scholarship.

Dennis O’Rourke, foundation distinguished professor in the Department of Anthropology, and Donna Ginther, professor in the Department of Economics, recently spoke at The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) 2017 Annual Meeting in Boston, MA. AAAS is a non-profit dedicated to advancing science for the benefit of all people.

Allan Pasco, distinguished professor in the Department of French and Italian, has been granted the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award. The award, granted only to a select few, recognizes the publication of his tenth book “Balzac, Literary Sociologist.” Pasco also received the Jessie Marie Senor Cramer & Ann Cramer Root Cramer Award in recognition for outstanding teaching and research in the College.

Bozenna Pasik-Duncan, Chancellors Club Teaching Professor in the Department of Mathematics, was awarded the 2016 IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) Educational Activities Board Meritorious Achievement Award in Continuing Education for her work teaching control systems and promoting STEM education. Pasik-Duncan was also recently selected the 2017 Global Chair of the IEEE Women in Engineering Committee. She  will oversee the world’s largest organization for women in science and engineering.

Bozenna Pasik-Duncan, professor in the Department of Mathematics, will receive the Outstanding Service Award from the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC) in recognition for her years of service. The IFAC is a federation of 52 different nations representing engineering and scientific societies aiming to promote the science and technology of control.

Nicole Hodges Persley, associate professor in the Department of Theatre, led the KU Interactive Theatre Troupe to an honor in the group category at the first Diversity Leadership Awards from the Office of Diversity & Equity. The troupe is a group of student actors, writers and directors using performance to help students and the Lawrence community engage in discussions on diversity, equity and inclusion. Persley’s research covers the effect of race and ethnicity on contemporary performance practices.

Shannon Portillo, associate professor in the School of Public Affairs & Administration, received the Schowen Undergraduate Research Mentor Award for her work mentoring and developing undergraduate researchers. The award provides recipients with $1,000.

Emily Rauscher, assistant professor in the Department of Sociology, received a grant from the William T. Grant Foundation. The support will assist in Rauscher’s examination of the relationship between school funding and academic achievement gaps by socioeconomic status. Educators and policymakers for decades have grappled with the disparity in academic performance between groups of students.

Derek Reed, associate professor in the Department of Applied Behavioral Science, was named the Department of Psychology’s 2016 Alumnus of the Year from his alma mater Illinois State University. The honor recognizes his research on the behavioral economics of substance use disorders and their effect on novel areas of behavioral addiction, such as texting-and-driving and indoor-tanning.

Gary Reich, associate professor in the Department of Political Science, was named as the 2017-2018 Gene A. Budig Teaching Professor. The award from the College honors an outstanding faculty member in the social or behavioral sciences who has made a profound contribution to teaching.

Kristin Rennells, office manager in the Department of Physics & Astronomy, was named a KU Employee of the Month for October. Rennells helps visitors find the information they need and organizes all department-wide events.

Mark Reynolds, director of finance and planning for the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, was named one of KU’s employees of the month in August. Reynolds oversees the use of financial resources throughout the College.

Kathryn Rhine, associate professor in the Department of Anthropology, recently won a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. As director of the project, titled “Global Medical Humanities: Bridging Digital Divides in Healthcare,” Rhine will oversee the development of a proposed curriculum covering global health and medicine.

Trevor Rivers, lecturer and academic program associate in the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, was recently honored for his work on the BBC documentary “Light on Earth.” The film won two awards at the Wildscreen Panda Awards and continues to draw acclaim worldwide.

Reggie Robinson, director and professor at the School of Public Affairs & Administration, was elected to serve as Chair of the Board of Directors for the National Academy of Public Administration, one of only two congressionally chartered academies. The Academy is an independent non-profit organization established to assist government leaders in building stronger organizations.

Joan Sereno, professor and chair in the Department of Linguistics, was elected Chair of Section Z, the Linguistics and Language Science section, in the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The AAAS is a non-profit dedicated to advancing science for the benefit of all people.

Elizabeth Schultz, professor emeritus in the Department of English, was awarded the 2016 Career Achievement Teaching Award from the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences in recognition of a career dedicated to excellence in teaching over 30 years.

Erik Scott, assistant professor in the Department of History, was awarded a Summer Stipend from the National Endowment for the Humanities to study and produce a book, tentatively titled "Soviet Defectors and the Borders of the Cold War World." The stipend is worth $6,000.

Jan Bowen Sheldon, professor in the Department of Applied Behavioral Science, was inducted this spring into the KU Women’s Hall of Fame. The Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity annually honors a select group of women who have enriched KU’s legacy through their contributions and impact in their fields.

Joanna Slusky, assistant professor of molecular biosciences and computational biology, was named one of the five inaugural recipients of a major fellowship for outstanding inventors, the Moore Inventor Fellowship. This new fellowship program recognizes early-career innovators at U.S. universities with a high potential to accelerate progress in scientific research, environmental conservation and patient care. Slusky was recognized for her invention of a protein that will re-sensitize bacteria to common antibiotics, thereby overcoming drug-resistant superbugs. Her invention could have a global impact on antibiotic resistance and re-establish the efficacy of antibiotics.

William Staples, professor and chair in the Department of Sociology, was recently awarded the Surveillance Studies Network Book Prize for his book “Everyday Surveillance: Vigilance and Visibility in Postmodern Life.”  The award is presented to the best surveillance book published in the last calendar year.

Mary Strickell, graduate studies coordinator for the Department of History, received the first-ever College "Above and Beyond Staff Award." Carl Lejuez, dean of the College, presented Strickell the award, noting "Mary is clearly dedicated to providing the highest level of service and to being an advocate for her students.” Strickell attended all of the workshops and staff meetings offered by both COGA and the Office of Graduate Studies this past year.

Daniel Tapia Takaki, assistant professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy, organized an Institute of Nuclear Theory workshop at KU from Feb. 13-17. The Institute of Nuclear Theory is hosted by the University of Washington and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. Workshop hosts are selected through a grant application process.

Alfred Tat-Kei Ho, professor in the KU School of Public Affairs & Administration, received the 2015 Best Paper Award of the American Review of Public Administration for his study on budgeting reforms in developing countries.

Orley “Chip” Taylor, professor emeritus in the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, was recently named an honorary member of The Garden Club of America, one of its highest accolades. No more than four honorary members are selected each year. Taylor is the founder and director of Monarch Watch.

Dave Tell, associate professor in the Department of Communication Studies, will head a project transforming the Mississippi courtroom where Emmett Till’s murderers were acquitted in 1955 into a history museum. The restoration and installation of exhibits will be funded by a grant from the National Parks Service. Tell is a member of the Emmett Till Memory Project team, where he works with Mississippi community groups and other scholars to commemorate the memory of Till. Tell also received a 2017 University Scholarly Achievement Award. The awards, presented by the chancellor, recognize significant scholarly or research achievement for scholars in the middle of their careers. Research colleagues submitted the winners for consideration. The award recognizes either a truly outstanding scholarly or research contribution, or a series of closely related contributions.

Dave Tell, associate professor in the Department of Communication Studies, won the first-ever Community Engaged Scholarship Award from the College. Tell was recognized for his work on the Emmett Till Memory Project, a collaborative public humanities project that uses a variety of digital and print tools to commemorate 10 sites related to the murder of Emmett Till in the Mississippi Delta.

Rodolfo Torres, professor in the Department of Mathematics, was named a University Distinguished Professor in recognition for his work on the theoretical and applied aspects of harmonic analysis.

Rodolfo Torres, distinguished professor in the Department of Mathematics, received the 2017 Morrison Foundation Teaching Award. The award was established by Morrison Foundation and awarded by the Department of Mathematics. Recipients are recognized for their exemplary teaching and an active research program.

Sherrie Tucker, professor in the Department of American Studies, Michelle Heffner Hayes, professor and chair in the Department of Dance, and Nicole Hodges Persley, associate professor and acting chair in the Department of Theatre, received a $35,000 National Endowment for the Arts grant to stage a symposium using a computerized musical instrument that allows participation by people of all abilities. The Adaptive Use Musical Instrument is a software interface that utilizes movement to trigger a variety of sounds. Tucker has worked with the AUMI for nine years. The NEA says the grant supports “the creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence… lifelong learning and the strengthening of communities through the arts.”

Benjamin Uchiyama, assistant professor in the Department of History, received a Fulbright award to fund two research trips to Japan. Fulbright awards enable recipients to teach and conduct research overseas as well as work with international peers. The grant will cover two 3-month segments in summer 2018 and summer 2019.

Joy Ward, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, received a 2017 University Scholarly Achievement Award. The awards, presented by the chancellor, recognize significant scholarly or research achievement for scholars in the middle of their careers. Research colleagues submitted the winners for consideration. The award recognizes either a truly outstanding scholarly or research contribution, or a series of closely related contributions.

Steven Warren, distinguished professor and Nancy Brady, associate professor, both of the Department of Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences & Disorders, were awarded a grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to aid in their research on the effects of parenting on the development and behavior of adolescents with Fragile X syndrome, the leading genetic cause of autism. The five-year grant is for $2.4 million. Warren was also named a University Distinguished Professor for his work on language and language interventions in the area of intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Robert Warrior, distinguished professor in the Departments of English and American Studies, is assuming the presidency of the American Studies Association. Warrior succeeds Dave Roediger, Foundation Distinguished Professor in the Departments of History and American Studies. The American Studies Association supports scholars and scholarship committed to original research, innovative teaching, critical thinking, and public discussion.

Jennifer Weber, associate professor in the Department of History, will be a teaching fellow next year at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO. Weber’s studies focus on the Civil war and Abraham Lincoln.

Gina Westergard, associate professor in the Department of Visual Art, created a tiara that has been recently acquired as part of the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art’s permanent collection. The tiara is currently on display in an exhibition titled “Acts of Nature: Contemporary Decorative Art.”

Glen White, professor in the Department of Applied Behavioral Science, will co-direct a project with Craig Ravesloot, professor at the University of Montana to promote community participation for adults with physical disabilities. The National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research awarded the University of Kansas Research and Training Center on Independent Living a five-year, $4.375 million grant for the project.

Crispin Williams, associate professor in the Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures, was named a Hall Center Resident Fellow for 2017-’18. Williams will work on his book project,” Oath, Covenant and Curse in Ancient China.”

Kevin Willmott, professor in the Department of Film & Media Studies, received the Gordon Parks Choice of Weapons Award at the annual Gordon Parks Celebration at Fort Scott Community College. The Choice of Weapons Award, named after Parks’ autobiography of the same name, seeks to honor a recipient who excelled in one of the areas that Gordon Parks did and who exemplifies his spirit and strength of character.

Antje Ziethen, assistant professor in the Department of French, Francophone & Italian Studies, was named a Hall Center Resident Fellow for 2017-’18. Ziethen will work on her book project, “Heteropolis: The Urban Americas in African Literature.”

Email clasnews@ku.edu about your or a colleague's awards, honors or distinctions to be included in the College Kudos.