Winter Session Classes 2020

Undergraduate Winter Session classes in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences are 4-week, fully online courses offered during the winter break. 

Winter 2020 classes begin December 28th, 2020 and end January 22, 2021. 

Why take a winter session class?

Catch up, get ahead, knock out a KU Core requirement - all solid reasons to take a winter session class. Receive credit for taking a four week, online course during your winter break. Find out more about KU's online offerings.

Can I take a winter class?

Winter session is open to any and all students interested in any of the classes offered. You can find a list of classes below. Due to the accelerated pace of winter classes we do recommend that you only take one class per winter session, but two is sometimes doable. Make a solid plan for success using our Guide to Online Success!

There are 5 spots in each winter class that are reserved for students with graduation hardships. If you find you cannot enroll in a winter course and you are not a senior, or have other extenuating circumstances, you can add yourself to the waitlist. Those with hardships should contact thecollegeonline@ku.edu for permission to enroll, only after trying to enroll. 

Having trouble finding winter classes?
Find available classes by searching for the course in Enroll and Pay, and choosing the section with the Class Number in the table below. Classes can also be found through Schedule of Classes by limiting search to "only sections that are not full term" and then looking for the dates that correspond to the winter session.

IMPORTANT THINGS TO KNOW
Winter session counts toward your spring enrollment for financial aid purposes, and for calculating full or part-time studnet status in the spring. If between the hours you enroll in for the traditional spring semester and winter session exceed 20 hours, you will need to complete a request to enroll in excess hours.

Tuition and fees for winter session will be calculated together with your total spring enrollment, no additional fees apply for winter session enrollment outside of your normal tuition and fees assessment. Winter session occurs before financial aid refunds are dispersed. Expect to pay out of pocket for books and other expenses until funds are disbursed after the start of the spring semester.

Winter session classes are counted as any other course for determining Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) for financial aid.Remember to consider this carefully before dropping/withdrawing from a winter course. 

Add/Drop dates for the Winter Session COMING SOON

 

Contact the College Online at thecollegeonline@ku.edu with any questions or for more information.

Winter Session Courses

Course Number Section Number Course Title Course Attribute
AAAS 104 59118 Intro African-American Studies AE41, SC, U
Interdisciplinary introduction to the basic concepts and literature in the disciplines covered in African American Studies. Includes the social sciences, and humanities (including history, religion, and literature) as well as conceptual framework for investigation and analysis of Black history and culture and society.
AAAS 105 50695 Intro to African History GE11, GE3H, NW, W
An introduction to important historical developments in Africa. Topics include empires, kingdoms, the slave trade, European colonialism, liberation movements, national identities, and a return to independence. (Same as HIST 104.)
ABSC 100 56112 Introd Applied Behavrl Science GE11, GE3S, S, SI
An introduction to the principles of behavioral science and their application to problems facing contemporary societies (e.g., autism, public health, education, juvenile delinquency, substance abuse). Students will learn how behavioral scientists analyze human behavior and how these analyses are used to inform interventions. Students will also learn about careers in the behavioral sciences and how to pursue them. Course may be offered in lecture or online format.
ABSC 150 51657 Community Leadership AE51
An introduction to analysis, intervention, evaluation, and leadership in contemporary problems facing local communities. Readings, lectures, and service-learning activities enable students to understand community problems and how citizens and professionals can address them.
ABSC 151 51708 Community Leadership, Honors AE51
An introduction to analysis, intervention, evaluation, and leadership in contemporary problems facing local communities. Readings, lectures, and service-learning activities enable students to understand community problems and how citizens and professionals can address them. Open only to students in the University Honors Program.
ABSC 160 48970 Intro to Child Behavior and Development GE3S
ABSC 360 51664 Drugs, Addiction, and Behavior Elective
This course offers an overview of the basic and applied research in behavioral pharmacology and addictions, as well as interventions. Among the topics it covers are a history of drugs, addiction, and behavior; basic principles of drug action (e.g., pharmacodynamics); behavioral pharmacology testing paradigms (e.g., self-administration); drug action and effects (e.g., alcohol, nicotine, designer drugs, anti-depressants); behavioral deficits associated with addictions (e.g., memory); addiction treatment and recovery (e.g., maturing out, contingency management); and drugs and society. Prerequisite: ABSC 100. PSYC 104 is also recommended.
AMS 100 50622 Intro to American Studies GE3H, AE41
An introduction to the history and key concepts of American Studies. Students explore major changes in American culture through the critical reading and analysis of primary and secondary source material. Not open to students who have taken AMS 101.
AMS 110 55110 American Identities AE41, GE3S, S, SC
An interdisciplinary introduction to individual and group identities over time. Students explore theories and methods relating to identity from various perspectives, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, age, religion, and region. Not open to students who have taken AMS 112 or SOC 112. (Same as SOC 110.)
AMS 332 51093 United States in Global Context AE42
Examines the influence abroad of US culture, policies and practices and the impact of other countries on US culture, society, and politics. Among the topics that may be examined are race, ethnicity, colonialism, imperialism, migration, technology, communications and media, popular culture, language, health, domestic and transnational organizations, as well as economic, political, religious, military and educational institutions. (Same as SOC 332).
ANTH 160 56062 Varieties of Human Experience AE42, GE3H, GE3S, NW, S, W
An introduction to basic concepts and themes in cultural anthropology by means of the comparative study of selected cultures from around the world, for the purpose of appreciating cultural diversity. Emphasis is on systems of belief and meaning. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 360.
ANTH 304 52363 Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology GE3N
A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 104. Not open to students who have had ANTH 104 or ANTH 105.
ANTH 360 56063 Varieties of Human Experience AE42, GE3H, GE3S, NW, S, W
AA more intensive treatment of ANTH 160. An introduction to basic concepts and themes in cultural anthropology by means of the comparative study of selected cultures from around the world, for the purpose of appreciating cultural diversity. Emphasis is on systems of belief and meaning. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 160.
ANTH 389 56089 Anthro Gender: Female, Male & Beyond AE42, GE21, GE3H, GE3S, NW, W
This course will introduce students to cultural constructions and performances of masculinity, femininity, and alternative genders across time and space. Topics and cases will be drawn from primarily non-Western cultures, ranging from Japanese markets to Pacific Rim gardens, and from Haitian voudou to Maya royal politics. This course uses research by archeologists, linguists, biological anthropologists, and sociocultural anthropologists. (Same as WGSS 389.)
ANTH 484 55362 Magic, Science, and Religion AE42, GE3S, NW, S, W
A comparative study of religion and systems of value and belief in non-Western cultures.
CLSX 148 54438 Greek and Roman Mythology GE3H, W
A systematic examination of the traditional cycles of Greek myth and their survival and metamorphosis in Latin literature. Some attention is given to the problems of comparative mythology and the related areas of archaeology and history. Slides and other illustrated materials. No knowledge of Latin or Greek is required.
CLSX 332 54439 Medical Terminology: Greek & Latin Roots GE3H, H, HL
A comprehensive study of the Greek and Latin elements in medical terminology. Students will learn word roots and how to combine them, as well as become acquainted with their relationship to mythology and the influence of ancient ideas about health and the body on modern healthcare. This class is useful for anyone going into the health field including management, clinical areas, insurance, and technical fields. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. A student may not receive credit for both CLSX 232 and CLSX 332.
CLSX 384 55528 Ethics in Greek Tragedy AE51, H, HL
This course provides an introductory survey of theories of morality and uses Greek tragedy as case studies for understanding ethical problems. Students will read passages from ethical theorists alongside plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, giving particular attention to identifying the ethical dilemmas the characters face, the criteria by which these characters make their decisions, ethical assessment of their decisions by their own standards and by those of ethical theories, and the role of cultural context in understanding the ethical dimensions of the plays. No knowledge of Greek is required.
ECON 142 57253 Principles of Microeconomics GE3S, QR, S, SF
An analytical introduction to microeconomics. Topics include theory of markets, public policy, international trade, economic efficiency, and equity. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 103 or MATH 104, or eligibility for MATH 115 or MATH 125 or MATH 126.
ECON 426 57254 Statistics and Data Analysis S
An introduction to probability and statistical methods for empirical work in economics. Probability, random variables, sampling, descriptive statistics, probability distributions, estimation hypothesis testing, introduction to the regression model. Prerequisite: MATH 115 or MATH 125.
EVRN 336 57876 Ethics, Ideas and Nature AE51, H
This course examines the ethical frameworks developed for thinking about, using, and protecting the natural world. Examples of topics include indigenous approaches to nature, the history of ecological ideas, environmental movements, the role of the state in managing resources, utilitarianism and progressivism, environmental lawmaking, wilderness advocacy, nature and theology, the rights of nature, and environmental justice. Students are introduced to the theories of duty ethics, justice ethics, utilitarianism, and rights ethics, and required to apply ethical decision making to contemporary and historical environmental issues. Multiple perspectives on the history of human interactions with nature demonstrate the importance of reflecting upon the value systems inherent in human-centered environmental ethics and nature-centered environmental ethics. (Same as HIST 336.).
FMS 410 54195 U.S. Diversity in Visual Culture AE41, H
This course examines the way in which diversity in the United States, including race, class, gender, and sexuality, are represented through visual culture, historically and in the present. The study of visual culture analyzes the way in which visual images communicate systems of beliefs, contribute to identity formation, and have an influence on our thinking about diversity. Course looks at United States visual objects (i.e., film, television, photography, art, advertisements, and theatre as well as visual practices, i.e., in public and private spaces.
GEOL 301 52417 Introduction to Oceanography GE3N, N
The online course is an introduction to the earth and its oceans, including a discussion of the history of ocean exploration using the approach of the scientific method. The course will explore theories that describe the origin of the solar system, the earth, the atmosphere, and the oceans, in addition to a discussion of the origin of life on the earth. The course will cover the essential physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and the concepts of plate tectonics, as applied to understanding the oceans and seas. This course cannot be taken if a student has completed GEOL 302.
GEOL 548 52418 Geology and Culture of Polynesia AE42
Polynesia, encompassing over 1,000 islands in the southern and central Pacific Ocean, was the last region of the Earth to be settled by humans. Around 3000-1000 BCE, people from northwest Melanesia first reached one of these islands, and over the next few centuries spread to colonize all of the islands. However, despite the fact that all of the Polynesian islands were settled by colonists who stemmed from a single population with a shared culture, language, technology, and agriculture, the cultures of these islands are incredibly rich and varied. In this course we will examine some of the cultural mores and practices of the Polynesian islands, including how these were shaped by the climate, geology, soil, hydrology, and marine resources of each individual island. In this course we will examine these factors and assess their potential impact on the cultures present in the region. Prerequisite: A course in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or Geology.
HIST 104 50696 Intro to African History H
An introduction to important historical developments in Africa. Topics include empires, kingdoms, the slave trade, European colonialism, liberation movements, national identities, and a return to independence. (Same as AAAS 105.)
HIST 124 51707 Latin American Culture & Society AE42
An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of Latin America, as manifest in the arts and literature, history, and in environmental, political, economic, and social realities. Explores and critiques the principal themes and methodologies of Latin American Studies, with an aim towards synthesizing contributions from several different disciplines. Emphasizes the unique insights and perspectives made possible by interdisciplinary collaboration and provides students with the basic knowledge base for understanding Latin America today. (Same as LAA 100.)
HIST 353 55721 Indigenous Peoples of North America AE41, H, NW, W
This course surveys the history of the first peoples to inhabit North America from prehistory to present. Commonly and collectively referred to as American Indians, indigenous peoples include a diverse array of nations, chiefdoms, confederacies, tribes, and bands, each of which has its own unique cultures, economies, and experiences in dealing with colonial and neocolonial powers. This class seeks to demonstrate this diversity while at the same time providing an understanding of the common struggle for political and cultural sovereignty that all indigenous nations face. Indigenous nations that have developed a relationship with the United States will receive primary focus, but comparative reference will be made to First Nations of Canada.
ISP 304 58217 Indigenous Peoples of North America H
This course concentrates on selected problems in the interdisciplinary field of Indigenous Studies. Courses in this field utilize methods developed in various disciplines to examine issues related to the survival, self-sufficiency, mutual support, empowerment, and decolonization of Indigenous Peoples throughout the world. May be repeated for credit when the topic differs.
LAA 100 51706 Latin American Culture & Society AE42
An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of Latin America, as manifest in the arts and literature, history, and in environmental, political, economic, and social realities. Explores and critiques the principal themes and methodologies of Latin American Studies, with an aim towards synthesizing contributions from several different disciplines. Emphasizes the unique insights and perspectives made possible by interdisciplinary collaboration and provides students with a basic knowledge base for understanding Latin America today. (Same as HIST 124.)
LDST 200 56227 Introduction to Leadership Studies & Applications S, SC
This course combines an introduction to a theoretical, research-based approach to the study of leadership with hands-on application, analysis and experimentation with the process of leadership. Students will explore core leadership competencies and apply leadership tools and processes across a variety of groups and systems, addressing issues of concern within those communities. This course satisfies the LDST 201/LDST 202 prerequisite for the Leadership Studies Minor. This course is not available to students with credit in LDST 201/LDST 202. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatifactory basis. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
LING 110 55775 Language and Mind GE11, GE3S, S, SI
A study of the relation between language and the human mind, focusing on language as a fundamental aspect of human cognition. Topics include what is innate and what is learned during first and second language acquisition, how we process language, and whether there are areas of the brain specialized for language.
LING 320 55776 Language in Culture and Society AE41, AE61, S, SC
Language is an integral part of culture and an essential means by which people carry out their social interactions with the members of their society. The course explores the role of language in everyday life of peoples in various parts of the world and the nature of the relationship between language and culture. Topics include world-view as reflected in language, formal vs. informal language, word taboo, and ethnography of speaking. (Same as ANTH 320.)
PHSX 211 58654 General Physics I GE11, GE12, GE3N, LFE, N, NP
Introduction to classical mechanics and thermodynamics. Designed for students in engineering and physical science majors. Prerequisite: MATH 116 or MATH 125 or MATH 145. Corequisite MATH 126 or MATH 146; courses in high school physics and/or chemistry are recommended.
POLS 110 57687 Introduction to U.S. Politics GE3S
An introduction to basic American governmental institutions, political processes, and policy.
POLS 330 58793 Introduction to Public Administration S
Introduction to administration, public policy and policy makings is the study of government workers, the organizations in which they work, how they are financed, and how government engages citizens to help form and maintain community. In various ways, the class sessions explore the three important issues of public administration: discretion, authority, and accountability. (Same as PUAD 330.) Prerequisite: POLS 110.
PSYC 598 59169 Edwards, 59006 Lawrence Positive Psychology S
An introduction to the core assumptions and research findings associated with human strengths and positive emotions. Also an exploration of interventions and applications informed by positive psychology in counseling and psychotherapy, and its application to school, work, family and other close relationships. (Same as EPSY 580.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or consent of instructor.
PUAD 330 43847 Edwards, 58794 Lawrence Introduction to Public Administration S
Introduction to administration, public policy and policy makings is the study of government workers, the organizations in which they work, how they are financed, and how government engages citizens to help form and maintain community. In various ways, the class sessions explore the three important issues of public administration: discretion, authority, and accountability. (Same as POLS 330.) Prerequisite: POLS 110.
SOC 110 55111 American Identities AE41, GE3S, S, SC
An interdisciplinary introduction to individual and group identities over time. Students explore theories and methods relating to identity from various perspectives, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, age, religion, and region. Not open to students who have taken AMS 112 or SOC 112. (Same as AMS 110.)
SOC 304 58962 Edwards, 57252 Lawrence Principles of Sociology AE41, GE11, GE3S, S, SC
An introduction to sociological concepts, methods, and substantive findings more intensive than that provided in SOC 104. Students may take this course in lieu of SOC 104 to satisfy requirements for the major and the minor. This course may not be taken for credit by those who have taken SOC 104.
SOC 332 51094 United States in Global Context AE42
Examines the influence abroad of US culture, policies and practices and the impact of other countries on US culture, society, and politics. Among the topics that may be examined are race, ethnicity, colonialism, imperialism, migration, technology, communications and media, popular culture, language, health, domestic and transnational organizations, as well as economic, political, religious, military and educational institutions. (Same as AMS 332).
WGSS 101 55672 Introduction to Women,Gender, & Sexuality Studiess GE3S, AE41
This course examines the extensive role of gender in human life and examines the ways that gender structures power relations among individuals and within economic, political, educational and other social structures, with special attention paid to women's issues and movements in the United States and globally. Through readings drawn from the fields of women's studies, gender studies, and sexuality studies, this course examines and explores alternatives to traditional and/or normative constructions of gender and sexuality, and also considers other markers of difference, such as disability, race, class, and religion, which intersect with gender identity and sexual identity.
WGSS 389 56088 Another Gender: Female, Male, & Beyond AE42, GE21, GE3H, GE3S, NW, W
This course will introduce students to cultural constructions and performances of masculinity, femininity, and alternative genders across time and space. Topics and cases will be drawn from primarily non-Western cultures, ranging from Japanese markets to Pacific Rim gardens, and from Haitian voudou to Maya royal politics. This course uses research by archeologists, linguists, biological anthropologists, and sociocultural anthropologists. (Same as ANTH 389.)