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  • 2018-19 Winter Session

Winter Session Classes 2018

What?
Receive credit for taking a four week, online course during your winter break. Find out more about KU's online offerings.

Who?
Winter session is open to any and all students interested in any of the courses offered. You can find a list of classes below.

When?
Courses will run from Dec. 17 through Jan. 11.

Where?
The best part of winter session is that you can access your class from anywhere around the globe. All classes are conducted online—no physical attendance necessary!

Why?
Stay on track to graduation! Taking advantage of the winter session allows you to earn more credits toward graduation from home while also having the time to focus on just one subject. Plus, those required to take 30 hours for the academic year can make up for a fall or spring semester where they took 12 hours or less.

How?
Find available courses by searching for the course code in Enroll and Pay. Classes can also be found through Schedule of Classes by limiting search to "only sections that are not full term" and then looking for the dates that correspond to the winter session.

Important reminders:
Winter Session courses are included as a part of your spring enrollment for financial aid purposes and for calculating full or part-time student status. If between the hours you enroll in for the traditional spring semester and winter session exceed 20 hours, you will need to complete a request to enroll in excess hours. Tuition and fees for winter session will be calculated together with your total spring enrollment, no additional fees apply for winter session enrollment outside of your normal tuition and fees assessment. Winter session occurs before financial aid refunds are dispersed. Expect to pay out of pocket for books and other expenses until funds are disbursed after the start of the spring semester.

Winter session courses are counted as any other course for determining Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) for financial aid. Remember to consider this carefully before dropping/withdrawing from a winter course. 

Add/Drop dates for the Winter Session are:

Last day to add with approval: Dec. 23, 2018
Last day for CR/No CR: Dec. 27, 2018
Last day to withdraw: Jan. 7, 2019
Last day to cancel: Dec. 21, 2018
Last day for 100 percent refund: Dec. 17, 2018
Last day for 50 percent refund: Dec. 22, 2018

Contact the College Online at thecollegeonline@ku.edu with any questions or for more information.

Winter Session Courses

Course Number Section Number Course Title Course Attribute
AAAS 102 71279 Arabic and Islamic Studies GE3H, GE3S, NW, AE42
An introduction to the study of Islam and the Arabic language in relation to Islamic cultures in Africa, the Mediterranean region, and beyond. Topics covered include the historical origins of Islam in relation to the Arabic language and its cultures of origin. This course is interdisciplinary, including attention to the topic from the perspectives of historical unfolding of both the language and religion, geographic and cultural perspectives, political and economic concerns, and aesthetic perspectives, including literature and the arts.
AAAS 104 72827 Intro to African American Studies AE41
Interdisciplinary introduction to the basic concepts and literature in the disciplines covered in African American Studies. Includes the social sciences, and humanities (including history, religion, and literature) as well as conceptual framework for investigation and analysis of Black history and culture and society.
AAAS 105 72832 Intro to African History GE11, GE3H, NW, W
An introduction to important historical developments in Africa. Topics include empires, kingdoms, the slave trade, European colonialism, liberation movements, national identities, and a return to independence. (Same as HIST 104.)
AAAS 323 74930 African-American Studies In: African-American Childhood Youth in Film Elective
Lecture and discussion course in African-American area of current interest. May be repeated for credit toward the major.
ABSC 150 74642 Community Leadership AE51
An introduction to analysis, intervention, evaluation, and leadership in contemporary problems facing local communities. Readings, lectures, and service-learning activities enable students to understand community problems and how citizens and professionals can address them.
ABSC 151 74710 Community Leadership, Honors AE51
An introduction to analysis, intervention, evaluation, and leadership in contemporary problems facing local communities. Readings, lectures, and service-learning activities enable students to understand community problems and how citizens and professionals can address them. Open only to students in the University Honors Program.
ABSC 160 70580 Intro to Child Behavior and Development GE3S
An introduction to child behavior and development with an emphasis on the normal developmental range of growth, intelligence, cognition, emotion, language, and social skills from birth to adolescence.
ABSC 360 74652 Drugs, Addiction, and Behavior Elective
This course offers an overview of the basic and applied research in behavioral pharmacology and addictions, as well as interventions. Among the topics it covers are a history of drugs, addiction, and behavior; basic principles of drug action (e.g., pharmacodynamics); behavioral pharmacology testing paradigms (e.g., self-administration); drug action and effects (e.g., alcohol, nicotine, designer drugs, anti-depressants); behavioral deficits associated with addictions (e.g., memory); addiction treatment and recovery (e.g., maturing out, contingency management); and drugs and society. Prerequisite: ABSC 100. PSYC 104 is also recommended.
AMS 100 72733 Intro to American Studies GE3H, AE41
An introduction to the history and key concepts of American Studies. Students explore major changes in American culture through the critical reading and analysis of primary and secondary source material. Not open to students who have taken AMS 101.
AMS 332 73388 United States in Global Context AE42
Examines the influence abroad of US culture, policies and practices and the impact of other countries on US culture, society, and politics. Among the topics that may be examined are race, ethnicity, colonialism, imperialism, migration, technology, communications and media, popular culture, language, health, domestic and transnational organizations, as well as economic, political, religious, military and educational institutions. (Same as SOC 332).
AMS 344 72734 Case Study in American Studies: African-American Childhood Youth in Film Elective
This course examines in depth a specific American studies or theme.
ANTH 304 75911 Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology GE3N
A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 104. Not open to students who have had ANTH 104 or ANTH 105.
CLSX 148 78843 Greek and Roman Mythology GE3H, W
A systematic examination of the traditional cycles of Greek myth and their survival and metamorphosis in Latin literature. Some attention is given to the problems of comparative mythology and the related areas of archaeology and history. Slides and other illustrated materials. No knowledge of Latin or Greek is required.
CLSX 332 78844 Medical Terminology: Greek & Latin Roots Elective
A comprehensive study of the Greek and Latin elements in medical terminology. Students will learn word roots and how to combine them, as well as become acquainted with their relationship to mythology and the influence of ancient ideas about health and the body on modern healthcare. This class is useful for anyone going into the health field including management, clinical areas, insurance, and technical fields. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. A student may not receive credit for both CLSX 232 and CLSX 332.
EVRN 148 78639 Scientific Principals of Environmental Studies GE3N
This course provides the scientific knowledge necessary to understand the changing relationships between humans and the natural environment, with an emphasis on the assessment of current environmental problems and critical evaluation of potential solutions. Major topics include fundamental scientific concepts and principles, interactions among the biological and physical components of the environment, implications of a growing human population, water resources, the atmosphere, climate, and energy sources. (Same as GEOG 148.)
FMS 410 78417 US Diversity in Visual Culture AE41
This course examines the way in which diversity in the United States, including race, class, gender, and sexuality, are represented through visual culture, historically and in the present. The study of visual culture analyzes the way in which visual images communicate systems of beliefs, contribute to identity formation, and have an influence on our thinking about diversity. Course looks at United States visual objects (i.e., film, television, photography, art, advertisements, and theatre as well as visual practices, i.e., in public and private spaces.
GEOL 301 76009 Introduction to Oceanography GE3N
The online course is an introduction to the earth and its oceans, including a discussion of the history of ocean exploration using the approach of the scientific method. The course will explore theories that describe the origin of the solar system, the earth, the atmosphere, and the oceans, in addition to a discussion of the origin of life on the earth. The course will cover the essential physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and the concepts of plate tectonics, as applied to understanding the oceans and seas. This course cannot be taken if a student has completed GEOL 302.
GEOL 548 76010 Geology and Culture of Polynesia AE42
Polynesia, encompassing over 1,000 islands in the southern and central Pacific Ocean, was the last region of the Earth to be settled by humans. Around 3000-1000 BCE, people from northwest Melanesia first reached one of these islands, and over the next few centuries spread to colonize all of the islands. However, despite the fact that all of the Polynesian islands were settled by colonists who stemmed from a single population with a shared culture, language, technology, and agriculture, the cultures of these islands are incredibly rich and varied. In this course we will examine some of the cultural mores and practices of the Polynesian islands, including how these were shaped by the climate, geology, soil, hydrology, and marine resources of each individual island. In this course we will examine these factors and assess their potential impact on the cultures present in the region. Prerequisite: A course in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or Geology.
HIST 104 72833 Intro to African History H
An introduction to important historical developments in Africa. Topics include empires, kingdoms, the slave trade, European colonialism, liberation movements, national identities, and a return to independence. (Same as AAAS 105.)
HIST 124 74706 Latin American Culture & Society AE42
An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of Latin America, as manifest in the arts and literature, history, and in environmental, political, economic, and social realities. Explores and critiques the principal themes and methodologies of Latin American Studies, with an aim towards synthesizing contributions from several different disciplines. Emphasizes the unique insights and perspectives made possible by interdisciplinary collaboration and provides students with the basic knowledge base for understanding Latin America today. (Same as LAA 100.)
LAA 100 74704 Latin American Culture & Society AE42
An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of Latin America, as manifest in the arts and literature, history, and in environmental, political, economic, and social realities. Explores and critiques the principal themes and methodologies of Latin American Studies, with an aim towards synthesizing contributions from several different disciplines. Emphasizes the unique insights and perspectives made possible by interdisciplinary collaboration and provides students with a basic knowledge base for understanding Latin America today. (Same as HIST 124.)
LDST 201 72700 Introduction to Leadership Elective, unless with LDST 202 and then AE51
This course introduces students to the study of the leadership process. The course covers theories and research on core themes of leadership, focusing on how course materials relate to students' own leadership experiences. Concurrent enrollment in LDST 202 is recommended. Students considering the Leadership Studies Minor must complete LDST 202. Not open to seniors.
LDST 202 72700 Introduction to Leadership Applications AE51
This course focuses on the application of information learned in LDST 201. Activities and discussions emphasize application, analysis, and engagement with the process of leadership. Concurrent enrollment in LDST 201 is recommended. Students considering the Leadership Studies Minor must complete LDST 201 and LDST 202. Not open to seniors. Prerequisite: Corequisite: LDST 201.
LING 110 77780 Language and Mind GE11, GE3S, AE41
A study of the relation between language and the human mind, focusing on language as a fundamental aspect of human cognition. Topics include what is innate and what is learned during first and second language acquisition, how we process language, and whether there are areas of the brain specialized for language.
LING 320 73811 Language in Culture and Society AE41, AE61
Language is an integral part of culture and an essential means by which people carry out their social interactions with the members of their society. The course explores the role of language in everyday life of peoples in various parts of the world and the nature of the relationship between language and culture. Topics include world-view as reflected in language, formal vs. informal language, word taboo, and ethnography of speaking. (Same as ANTH 320.)
PHIL 148 72754 Reason and Argument GE11, GE3H
An introduction to the theory and practice of logical analysis. Special emphasis is placed upon the logical appraisal of everyday arguments.
POLS 110 72711 Introduction to U.S. Politics GE3S
An introduction to basic American governmental institutions, political processes, and policy.
PSYC 598 78578 Positive Psychology Elective
An introduction to the core assumptions and research findings associated with human strengths and positive emotions. Also an exploration of interventions and applications informed by positive psychology in counseling and psychotherapy, and its application to school, work, family and other close relationships. (Same as EPSY 580.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or consent of instructor.
SOC 332 73389 United States in Global Context AE42
Examines the influence abroad of US culture, policies and practices and the impact of other countries on US culture, society, and politics. Among the topics that may be examined are race, ethnicity, colonialism, imperialism, migration, technology, communications and media, popular culture, language, health, domestic and transnational organizations, as well as economic, political, religious, military and educational institutions. (Same as AMS 332).
WGSS 101 72737 Introduction to Women,Gender, & Sexuality Studiess GE3S, AE41
This course examines the extensive role of gender in human life and examines the ways that gender structures power relations among individuals and within economic, political, educational and other social structures, with special attention paid to women's issues and movements in the United States and globally. Through readings drawn from the fields of women's studies, gender studies, and sexuality studies, this course examines and explores alternatives to traditional and/or normative constructions of gender and sexuality, and also considers other markers of difference, such as disability, race, class, and religion, which intersect with gender identity and sexual identity.